Peoplocity Chosen for ACTE Global Conference

Peoplocity has been selected to present in the Association of Corporate Travel Executives (ACTE) Global Education Conference to be held April 23-25 in New York City. Peoplocity was chosen as an innovative and disruptive technology that is influencing the future of the travel industry. Peoplocity will be one of the technology companies featured in the ACTE Commons, an open customized learning space based on the seven spokes of the ACTE Ferris Wheel. Peoplocity will be on stage to highlight how its two-way text communication channel is supporting both the modern business traveler’s expectations and providing travel managers with data and insights to better manage their programs. In its business travel segment, Peoplocity lets travel managers and travel management companies provide travelers with an efficient text communication channel to get feedback, manage issues and share information with business travelers throughout their trip, in real-time. Travel managers get more in-depth data and travelers feel more secure. Peoplocity Founder and CEO, George Klein, is a serial entrepreneur and executive with proven success in a variety of businesses. He has vast experience in all aspects of ownership and management of new businesses and turnarounds. The common denominator for success in all these businesses has been Klein’s ability to create a company-wide focus on providing best-in-class service. “Business travelers want to know they can easily get help while on the road. Travel managers, TMCs, and suppliers want to be able to efficiently interact with travelers to resolve issues and share important information before, during and after a trip. They also need feedback from travelers on their interactions with airlines, hotels and transportation,” comments Klein....

Peoplocity Participates in ACTE Forum in San Francisco

George Klein, CEO/Founder of Peoplocity, will participate in a panel discussion at the ACTE Education Forum in San Francisco on November 2. The interactive discussion will focus on the evolving role of the travel manager with specific emphasis on the economic challenges, new technologies, hotel forecasts and controlling spend on ground transportation. George will share his expertise on using technology to improve the traveler experience. Other panel members include Matt Doherty, RVP West, Lyft, Jeff Hillenmayer, Head-Corp Sourcing Americas at HRS and Dorian Stonie, Sr Manager, Global Travel at Salesforce. The panel will be moderated by Ralph Colunga, Sr. Director, Global Travel and Marketing Support Services at Concur. The Association of Corporate Travel Executives (ACTE) has a 25-year reputation for leading the way corporate travel is conducted. As a global association, comprised of executive-level members in more than 100 countries, ACTE pioneers educational and technological advances that make business travel productive, cost-effective and straightforward.        ...

Businesses Strategies that Improve the Customer Experience

Think about getting prepared for a trip. You take off work, clear your calendar, book a room, pack up the house, make sure someone watches the pets, and the list goes on and on. By the time you arrive at the destination, you want to relax and be taken care of. As a business you need to be prepared for these weary travelers, by providing useful services before they become discouraged and take their annoyance out on your staff. Businesses need to think about what the customer needs before the customer does. A perfect example was sent to us from one of our app users. She was going on a trip to Chicago with her family. During their preparation and planning process, the hotel told them they could drop any bags off before parking. Having the hotel make a note of this eased her mind that no matter where the family may park there was no need to lug bags across busy streets to get back to the hotel. The hotel was prepared for customers searching for available parking which may not be close by. As the official parking search was about to begin, the concierge ran out to their car. He told her a parking spot had just been vacated in the lot. Then proceeded to tell her where the spot was and it was free parking for the duration of their stay. Imagine the excitement of this information! Not only are the bags already inside, but there was free on-site parking. A Chicago myth! The concierge saved his customer time, money and effort by taking the time...

Business Traveler Experience in the Spotlight

It’s no secret that managing a business travel program today is about much more than just containing costs. Successful programs balance policies to achieve improved traveler productivity and satisfaction in addition to achieving high levels of compliance and cost reduction. Businesses with travel programs of any size can get helpful insights from the 2015 Business Travel Survey released by Travizon. The results identify specific areas that can improve the travel experience, increase productivity and add to the satisfaction and retention of your business travelers. Survey results were broken out by age group, frequency of travel as well as by status within the company. While some results were predictable, others were interesting. It’s not surprising that different age groups want and need different things. For example, while a majority of business travelers dislike sprawlers and loud talkers, millennial travelers are most annoyed with kids and leisure travelers on their flights. Pain in the hotel space, such as an unclean room, had the biggest negative affect on traveler productivity. Pain in air space focused on lost baggage while terrorism was rarely mentioned as an anxiety. In ground transportation, the biggest hassles were picking up and dropping off a vehicle. No wonder Uber is doing so well! Speaking of Uber, a whopping 70% of millennials and 78% of frequent travelers say access to using Uber on business trips would improve their experience. When it comes to using technology, 47% of those surveyed want to use an online booking tool. A surprising 74% say they WANT their company to use a tracking tool and agreed with the statement “My employer should know where I am...

Peoplocity Heads to Virginia for the Travel Technology Talk

This week, Peoplocity travels to Virginia to present at the Global Business Travel Association (GBTA) event. The GBTA’s Travel Technology Talk focuses on new and emerging technologies in the travel industry. While there, Peoplocity will talk about how the Peoplocity can play a role in improving the corporate travel experience. Stephen Seh, the President of the Norther Virginia Chapter of GBTA, invited George Klein, Peoplocity Founder/CEO, to participate in the program after learning about Peoplocity at the ACTE Global Conference in Atlanta in April....

That Happens All the Time

Holiday air travel can bring out the worst in people. Add stress to an often chaotic system that already suffers from long lines, frequent delays, and short fuses, and the potential for an unhappy experience is greatly amplified. While a few airlines understand the need to go out of their way to help manage inevitable problems, many do not. Rude or callous responses to customer issues from overworked and stressed out employees can make matters far worse. Flying on a small regional commuter airline during the holidays, we were shuttled to the terminal in one of those small shuttle buses. Driving across the tarmac behind the luggage cart, we were appalled to see two large bags fall from the cart. Our bus scooted around the bags, and continued on. Arriving at the terminal, the owner of the bags complained to the gate agent.  The response? “Don’t worry. That happens all the time.” Wow! While that may be true, it was not reassuring to the passenger who’s bags were sitting in the middle of the tarmac. Instead of instilling confidence that the situation was well in hand, it created a sense of unease among all the passengers, wondering if our bags would be next. While this might be an extreme example, employees can often have a negative impact on a consumer experience by say absolutely the wrong thing at the wrong time to a customer who is already upset.  Along with “ That happens all the time”, have you heard: ” I am sorry, that’s not my job” or  “We don’t carry that item at this store” after you respond to a specific marketing promotion?...